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Monday, June 13th, 2011
Photo courtesy of Zukas Photography

Owner/Builder: Jacek Helenowski By Jason LeFleur One man’s dedication and research to a thorough whole-house remodeling project has resulted in the greenest home in Chicago, and quite possibly the greenest for the budget. Jacek Helenowski began meticulously renovating and building his home in Chicago’s far northwest side over 6 years ago, slowly working with thoughtful [...]

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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010
hall

Atlantic Fleet Drill Hall Team: Architect / Civil Engineer / Sustainable Design – LEED Consultant: Wight & Company, Structural Engineering: Larson Engineering, MEP Engineering: 20/10, Contractor: Old Vets/Pacific Joint Venture, MEP Contractor: Hill Mechanical, Steel Consultant: Boller Construction Bachelor’s Enlisted Quarters Team: Architect / Civil Engineer: Wight & Company, Design Architect: The Steinberg Group, MEP [...]

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Tuesday, August 24th, 2010
330-next-to-trump-constr

Location: 330 N. Wabash, Chicago, IL 60611 Contractor: Bear Construction Owner: Prime Group Realty Trust By William Olson At the Chicago River’s southerly hiccough, a modern icon has gone green. The building at 330 N. Wabash, Mies Van der Rohe’s architectural encore in America, recently underwent a sustainable renovation and earned the USGBC’s Silver Certification for [...]

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Friday, February 12th, 2010
155nwacker2

Location: 155 N. Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60606 Owner: JBC Opportunity Fund II & III / Morgan Stanley Real Estate Developer: The John Buck Company / Brijus Property Company Architect: Goettsch Partners General Contractor: Bovis Lend Lease Structural Engineer: Magnusson Klemencic Associates Mechanical Engineer: Hill Mechanical Group Owner-advocate for LEED Management: Environmental Systems Design Inc. [...]

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Thursday, May 21st, 2009
2931 W. Lyndale St.

Among the most innovative of the home’s green features is the use of insulating concrete forms (ICFs). According to the Insulating Concrete Forms Association’s website, the use of ICFs results in sturdier, quieter, more energy efficient homes. Instead of being made of wood paneling like traditional houses, ICF homes are built with concrete containing two layers of insulation, and are built to withstand the damages of fire, wind and time. The use of ICF should result in lower heating and cooling expenses.

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